Story Length: < 1 minute

An ant went to a fountain to quench his thirst and, tumbling in, was almost drowned. But a dove that happened to be sitting on a neighboring tree saw the ant’s danger and, plucking off a leaf, let it drop into the water before him. The ant mounting upon it, was presently wafted safely ashore.

Just at that time, a fowler was spreading his net and was in the act of ensnaring the dove, when the ant, perceiving his object, bit his heel. The start this gave the man made him drop his net and the dove, aroused to a sense of her danger, flew safely away.

One good turn deserves another.

About the Author

Aesop (/ˈiːsɒp/ EE-sop or /ˈeɪsɒp/ AY-sop; Greek: Αἴσωπος, Aísopos; c. 620–564 BCE) was a Greek fabulist and storyteller credited with a number of fables now collectively known as Aesop's Fables. Although his existence remains unclear and no writings by him survive, numerous tales credited to him were gathered across the centuries and in many languages in a storytelling tradition that continues to this day. Many of the tales are characterized by animals and inanimate objects that speak, solve problems, and generally have human characteristics.

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